Students

Students
Education is the key to unlock your future. Why GO get your education? Let’s see.
Top 4 reasons to stay in school.

Money – People who finish high school make more money than those who don’t.
Friends – Your friends depend on you more than you think.
Respect – Your friends and family will give you props. Plus, once you’ve graduated, no one can take that away.
Choices – The more education you have, the more career choices you’ll have in the future. You’ll be on your way to being a lifelong learner.
It’s important to help yourself. Find out what you need and GO get it. If you have friends in trouble, help them, too. Talk to them and encourage them to GO to our site and get started like you did. You may also visit Operation Graduation to help a friend or send them a “shout out” so they know you’re thinking about them.
By The Numbers
What’s Life Like For A High School Dropout?
You got what you thought was a great job and dropped out of high school. The job is tough but tolerable, and you’re making ends meet…barely. Bills are always taking your money, and there is rarely any leftover for the luxuries.
No nice car. No stereo. Just bills.
Average Annual Income by Educational Attainment,
U.S. Census Bureau 2000
No high school diploma: $14,349
What Can I Expect As A High School Graduate?
You were more interested in hanging out at the mall than going to school, but you made it through and received your high school diploma. Now you spend at least 40 hours a week at the mall as a sales clerk. You’ve got no insurance, no benefits, a dead-end job and bills to pay.
Average Annual Income by Educational Attainment,
U.S. Census Bureau 2000
No high school diploma: $14,349
High school diploma: $23,233
What Happens If I Pursue An Associate Degree?
You graduated from high school and took an entry-level job at a local office. You worked there for a few years. It wasn’t stressful. It also wasn’t challenging and didn’t offer any prospects for the future. You enrolled at a local community college and earned an associate’s degree. You are now living comfortably in a suburban neighborhood and have more options available for your future.
Average Annual Income by Educational Attainment,
U.S. Census Bureau 2000
No high school diploma: $14,349
High school diploma: $23,233
Associate degree: $31,684
What’s The Difference If I Have A Bachelor’s Degree?
You graduated from high school, enjoyed the summer and started classes at the university in the fall. After four years of football games, parties, all-night study sessions, research papers and internships, you landed the job of your dreams. You have a successful career, a nice home and a new car.
Average Annual Income by Educational Attainment,
U.S. Census Bureau 2000
No high school diploma: $14,349
High school diploma: $23,233
Associate degree: $31,684
Bachelor’s degree: $45,648
What Happens If I Get A Master’s Or Professional Degree?
You earned your bachelor’s and kept on going! Then a master’s degree. A professional degree. Hey, people are calling you “Doctor!” You are among an elite few who hold positions of power and leadership. Your decision to GO forward in school paid off!
Average Annual Income by Educational Attainment,
U.S. Census Bureau 2000
No high school diploma: $14,349
High school diploma: $23,233
Associate degree: $31,684
Bachelor’s degree: $45,648
Master’s degree: $56,958
Professional degree: $99,207
Doctoral degree: $87,644
Preparing for College. Are you ready to GO?
“Make the most of yourself, for that is all there is of you.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson
Hey, Georgia high school students. Are you prepared to GO forward in school and GO forward in life? The checklist below will help you on your way.
Freshman Year
Start thinking about the importance of lifelong learning and the value of a college education.
Change to well-paced studying. Stop the short-term cramming.
Start learning about the impact of grades and course selection on college admission.
Check curriculum requirements for college entrance and high school graduation.
Become involved in extracurricular activities, volunteering and internships or other work experiences.
When making decisions, begin to look at options carefully. Act decisively. Take responsibility for final decisions.
Learn more about college expenses. Talk to your parents and mentors about savings options.
Review your high school curriculum. Meet with your school counselor to review sophomore year course selection
Maintain good grades.
Sophomore Year
Start to talk to your teachers, parents and counselors regarding your interests and career possibilities.
Begin exploring preliminary college options.
Continue your extracurricular involvement and volunteer work. Begin to pursue leadership roles.
Begin exploring the PLAN (pre-ACT) and/or the PSAT exam.
Research Advanced Placement (AP) courses available at your school.
Keep college correspondence in a well-organized file.
Review your high school curriculum. Meet with your school counselor to review junior year course selection.
Maintain good grades.
Junior Year
Develop and follow a college search plan.
Share your plan with your family and school counselors.
Attend information sessions and college nights sponsored by your high school.
Consult your high school counselor for college search ideas and advice.
Review all options… research potential scholarships, state-administered grant programs and other financial assistance.
Obtain standardized test schedules from your school counselor.
Take the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT).
Plan on taking the ACT/SAT exams for the first time during your junior year. Prepare accordingly.
Research Advanced Placement or SAT II exams.
Meet with your school counselor to review senior year course selection and graduation requirements.
Maintain good grades.
Summer Before Senior Year
Sort through college mail as it arrives.
Review your ACT/SAT results and decide if you need to retest.
Visit different types of schools: small and large, vocational and liberal arts, private and public.
Develop a list of questions for colleges and take them with you on your visits.
Senior Year
Continue to take a full course load.
Maintain good grades.
Create a schedule of admission and student aid deadlines of the colleges you’re interested in attending. (Note: Meet deadlines when applying for merit-based scholarships and need-based assistance, such as FAFSA.)
Consider completing an application for the HOPE scholarship.
Select teachers/counselors to write recommendations on your behalf. Give them the necessary recommendation forms.
Request transcripts, write essays, complete admissions applications.
Follow-up to make sure each school has received all of the required application information.
Make additional visits and, if possible, spend the night and attend classes at your top three schools of interest.
Remain open-minded as the short list develops.
Stay positive. The search for the right school can often be tedious and stressful.
Compare student aid packages (if applicable) from the colleges where you have been accepted.
Discuss your options with your parents.
Make your final decision.
Notify the chosen school and send in your tuition deposit. (Note: After making your final decision, it is courteous to notify the other schools where you applied.)
“I can’t imagine a person becoming a success who doesn’t give this game of life everything he’s got.” – Walter Cronkite
Time Management Tips For High School Students It’s 10:00 — Do You Know Where Your Homework Is?
Time Management
“It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it.” – Vince Lombardi
Do you think colleges only care about grades? Think again. Volunteerism and extracurricular activities are also important. Volunteerism
“Always dream and shoot higher than you know how to. Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.” – William Faulkner
As you navigate through high school in Georgia, here’s help.
Info on Hope
High School Graduation Requirements (PDF)
High School Graduation Tests
More on High School Graduation Tests (PDF)
As you prepare your way to college, check out these helpful sites.